Monday, 9 December 2013

How to ensure AR programmes deliver to the bottom line - part two

The second of my guest posts, courtesy of Eria Odhuba, a founder member of The Comms Crowd and our resident analyst relations guru:
I'm telling you, my AR campaign was this big!

In part one of this series, we looked at the reasons AR programs fail and what you need to do before speaking to analysts. In this second part, we’ll look at some metrics you should consider measuring and a few questions you need to ask yourself to maximise the impact AR has on your marketing. This should help create the right foundation on which to build an effective AR programme.

Metrics to measure
If you don’t know your key marketing and sales metrics, how do you know what needs to improve? And if you don’t know what needs improving, then what is the point of doing AR? Typical metrics you need to know include:

1. Number of enquiries for a product or service;
2. Number of referrals made by existing customers or partners;
3. Percentage of enquiries and referrals converted into RFPs;
4. Typical lead response times;
5. Number of RFPs that convert into actual sales;
6. Number of active customers;
7. Total spend per active customer;
8. Customer churn rates;
9. Gross revenue;
10. Gross profit;
11. Marketing costs;
12. Marketing costs per enquiry;
13. Marketing costs as a % of gross profit;
14. Cost of sales (i.e. cost of converting RFPs into actual clients);

Once you have this information and can pass it along to your analysts, it is easier for them to compare you with competitors and work with you to identify specific activities or messages that need to be improved. Tap into their knowledge of industry go-to-market, partnership and channel strategies. Use their unique insight into competitor or industry-wide metrics to test how well you are doing. Most of the time, all you have to do is position your company more clearly in your target markets. If the analysts don’t believe your messages resonate with the needs of your prospects, you will need to keep tweaking;

The key marketing metric take-away is this: analysts can only help you improve your marketing and sales metrics if you measure them properly in the first place.

Is what you say you do what people think you do?
The key consideration here is that in order to develop an accurate representation of your company’s technology or services, you must first get the right feedback from customers, independent influencers and your employees.

To do this properly, you need to have a well-defined process in place to ask the right people the right questions, store the answers and provide easy access to anyone developing marketing strategies.

When approaching customers for feedback, you need to try and get them to do so based on a full understanding of the key competitive options available. You need to understand why they bought from you but might not do so again, or what their biggest frustrations are with vendors in your sector(s). Finally, you must understand where they look for information and how they make purchase decisions as this can help you direct resources to the most appropriate channels.

The feedback from your employees should be consistent across the various teams. There is nothing worse than having the sales and marketing teams disagree on the best action to take to generate leads or because of internal feuds.

Finally, all this feedback needs to be independently analysed or verified. This is where analysts are important. They should be used to sanity check feedback and company-led competitor research. They will compare it with opinions they get from end-users or your competitors. Based on this, they can advise you on how to use the feedback to change your product or service strategies.

Are you talking to the right people?
This is all about marketing to specific niches / target markets so that you maximise your marketing resources.
The people you target should want what you offer and be actively looking for a solution to specific problems that you can provide. More importantly, they should have the money to buy from you and be easily reached by your marketing efforts.

TAnalysts have a good knowledge of potential target markets and will give you advice on how best to reach out to them. They know the drivers and trends that impact purchase decisions. Though bound by client confidentiality, their inside knowledge should be tapped to re-focus your marketing messages and tactics. 
Analysts also monitor regulatory and industry trends and will suggest markets to consider that you might have ignored.

Part three, we’ll look at some thorny marketing problems AR can help solve.

Post script: These three AR posts have proved pretty popular. So we've put them together, ripped out the fluff, given it a bit of structure and turned them into a whitepaper, which you are welcome to download here:




Monday, 25 November 2013

Award-winning clients - I'm basking in their reflective glory

Tips for entering Tech Awards

Last week, BJSS, a CommsCrowd client, won the TechWorld Award for Best Public Sector project. It’s a genuinely cool project, re-engineering a very big data warehouse, bringing it in house, fully automating it and helping the NHS to save on human resource and money – both scarce commodities in the public sector these days.

if you had to guess which one of us was not an
award-winning software engineer, who would you pick?

The awards themselves were also impressive, in a transparently objective kind of way, projects were free to enter, award ceremony free to attend and they even gave an award to a company that couldn't make it – in all my days I’ve never seen that before – fair play.

So I am very pleased for my client, it’s a huge validation of the great work they are doing and I’m pretty pleased for us too. I didn’t write the award-winning software but I did have a hand in writing the award-winning entry.


 Here’s some tips for drafting those perfect 1,000 words:
  • Get buy in - you can’t do these on your own, work as close as you can with the client ping pong the entry back and forth until it's perfect.
  • Allow enough time  - we think it takes about a day and a half on average to draft and edit a standard 1.000 word award entry and that's assuming you already know the story.
  • Start early - it at least three weeks before - get information from source, ie the people that worked on the project.
  • Answer the question - every award has a bias so be sure to answer the questions exactly as asked.
  • Word count - keep it tight and don’t waffle.
  • Before and after stats demonstrating ROI - without these don’t bother to enter.
  • Have a heart – think of the poor judges and how many submission they have to read, do make an effort to tell a darn good yarn, keep the narrative sparkly and fluid.
If you found this interesting you might want to read a brief case study on our public sector campaign for BJSS

Post Script: other award winning entries include:
  • 15/04/2013 Caplin wins Best Web Implemntation at the Sell Side Technology Awards
  • 02/12/2013 BJSS wins Best Big Data Project at the Tech Success Awards.
  • 15/04/2014 Caplin wins Best Web Development Platform at the Sell Side Technology Awards.
  • 14/06/2014 BJSS wins Best Information Technology at the Best Business Awards
  • 14/07/2014 BJSS ranked fourth for International Growth in Sunday Times Tech Track 200 
  • 15/07/2014 Caplin wins Best Trading Technology Vendor at the FX Week Awards
Gonna need a bigger banner




Monday, 28 October 2013

How to ensure AR programmes deliver to the bottom line - part one

The first of my guest posts, courtesy of Eria Odhuba, a founder member of The Comms Crowd and our resident analyst relations guru:



There are many reports about how to conduct an analyst relations (AR) programme and you can also follow discussions on various LinkedIn groups too. Many of these cover some common areas, such as how to provide a good briefing or how to track and tier analysts. Yet some people find it difficult to measure the impact AR has on the bottom line and as a result, AR can be seen by the board simply as a cost centre with marketing teams struggling to extract and prove its value.

In this three-part series, we will look at how to integrate your good work with analysts and your analyst work with wider marketing activities, ensuring everything feeds into your overall objectives.

What defines a successful AR programme?
Successful AR programs use analysts to improve lead generation, shorten sales cycles and retain customers. That’s basically it!

When managing AR, companies should avoid briefing analysts simply with the short term aim of receiving positive feedback or a quote for a press release. Success has to have a positive effect on a company’s bottom line.

Look at the bigger picture: Analysts influence purchase decisions, through their reports, through a recommendation or as a result of help given by analysts to position a company more effectively within its target market. 

In a successful AR programme, marketing and sales teams work closely together. They involve analysts in the different steps of their mutually supportive strategies and ensure analyst feedback is shared internally with specific action resulting in more competitive positioning and compelling messaging, with customer focused products and services.

Give your AR programme a health check

Diagnosing of an ailing AR programme, does your AR programme suffer from any of the following?

· Lack of strategic direction, looking only for the endorsement or quote;
· Focus is on one-off engagements rather than building a relationship;
· You are deprived of the time, expertise or resources required to run a measurable programme;
· Lack of synchronicity with briefings not timed around analyst research or events;
· Analysts are treated in the same way as press when they are quite different creatures requiring an entirely different approach;
· Lack of preparation and training before speaking to analysts;
· Analyst feedback is not shared internally;
· Your AR programme is detached from other lead generation and sales activities.

Resulting symptoms of an ailing AR programme,  have you noticed any of the following struggles in your organisation?

· Difficulty forming an approach for new target markets as lack of independent insight;
· Outdated knowledge of key business or legislative drivers;
· Assumptions have to be made of what drives competitive success without independent testing;
· Limited ideas for possible partnership strategies;
· Limited channel knowledge and insights into where prospects look for information resulting in no new routes to market;
· Poor understanding if company messaging are resonating due to an absence of message testing strategies.

Check list to get your AR programme back in shape:

It’s really a matter of setting out your AR campaign with the same amount of diligence you would any other key engagement programme:

· Be clear what you want to get out of an AR programme. Raising awareness is all well and good but if it does not result in more leads or better client retention, then you need to change it;
· Get stakeholder buy in. Train spokespeople and teams about the value analysts provide;
· Develop proper metrics. Measuring briefing numbers and report mentions, running perception audits or getting placed in various analyst rating scales is all good. However, if there is no positive impact on the bottom line then you need to change your rethink the metrics you use;
· Define and target the right experts. Think about individual analysts and not just the firms they work for. Find out how they get information and influence decision-making processes. Don’t forget analysts from small or niche firms as they may have a unique market impact that you could leverage;
· Plan regular engagements to gain trust instead of one-off jobs every year, such as at events. Be prepared to follow up with information that actually helps an analyst with their research.

In the next post, we will start looking at the impact AR can have on various marketing tactics. and in  part three, we’ll look at some thorny marketing problems AR can help solve.

Post script: These three AR posts have proved pretty popular. So we've put them together, ripped out the fluff, given it a bit of structure and turned them into a whitepaper, which you are welcome to download here:




Saturday, 5 October 2013

Out Of Office - you can do it

With Elli, Zante, Summer 2013
As a freelancer, can you ever possibly take a holiday?

So I'm comparing tans and my friend ( the puny one) says, ‘So how come you keep taking all these holidays?’
 ’Cos my boss said I could.’ I smirk.
My pithy repost was met with a sigh of exasperation.

Obviously what my mate meant was, ‘So how on earth do you manage both to afford and to maintain client service levels when you are away for much of the summer and you are just a humble freelancer and therefore at everyone’s beck and call 365 days a year?’ 


With Mum and Elli, Devon, Summer 2013
But one of the main reasons I went freelance was to get closer to a good work/life balance. And I'm guessing that's why you did too and spending time with the people that matter most is a big part of that. I can't imagine you turned freelance to earn loads of money - so once the bills are paid, ‘affording’ to take time off is really just a matter of priorities. New bike, or a cycling holiday? New wardrobe, or a tan? It does help that I usually share the work I have got, so it's easy enough to ask one of the collective to be at the other end of the line if a client needs urgent advice while I'm away.

WIth Moby, Cornwall, Summer 2013







I fear that some freelancers just enslave themselves to their desks due to lack of faith, both in their own worth and the proverbial uncertainty of the future, rather than any real concrete reason. Do your best the rest of the year to look after a good client and a good client will look after you - afterall who needs a bad client?

With Lynne and Elli, Italy, Summer 2013






It should be remembered that the proverbial lament of the self-employed, ‘If I don’t work, I don’t get paid.’ Can be flipped on its head to also mean, ‘If I’m ok with not getting paid, I can take time off.’ 

So this year I did. 

Time off in search of half term sunshine on a farm in Greece, country house coddling in Snowdonia, the annual 50 miles trek around another bit of the Cornish Coast, armed with a dongle, we holed up in Devon for weeks and then went quite AWOL on a vast eating tour of Puglia. 

With Elli and that buffalo steak, Italy, Summer 2013
Ok so the blogging, the marketing, the banking, and the admin, the networking, the reading, erm they are in need of tending - but the clients and I are back on track and the house hasn't been repossessed, theres plenty of time for filing when it's cold.

Never lose focus on why you went freelance. It’s all too easy to constantly be hunting down your next job, but the people (and animals) you love are right here, waiting for you to switch off that laptop..


For more blogs on the freelance work/life balance:
Freelance Glorious Freelance - how to survive the feast and famine diet
Happy freelance birthday to me - I am two
Happy freelance birthday to me -I am one






Wednesday, 26 June 2013

15 and working that CV

As part of a wider CIPR initative, I spent yesterday in a London secondary school helping students with their interview skills.
Hermione: "I'm going to study hard so I can
go to Oxford when I grow up."
Ron:"I'm gonna be a film star!"

I was blown away( almost disturbed)  by how ‘on it’ some of my ‘candidates’ were: rocking up in business dress, with a firm handshake, beautifully presented CVs, charming covering letters, chatting away with confidence about their career aspirations and extra-curricular achievements, including, mentoring, team coaching and fundraising. And of course they followed up with a great email afterwards. They were 15! 

When I was 15 I'm sure CVs hadn't been created then and all I could mumble about was The Clash, The Cure and Siouxsie and The Banshees. My extra-curricular activities comprised entirely of locking myself away in my bedroom to listen to John Peel, write angsty poetry and draw dead-looking people. If sat on, I’d say I might write a column for Face Magazine when I grew up, but that was like, ages away, right? (or as it turned out never).

So while yesterday I was dazzled by the students that made Hermione Granger look rather shabby and ill-prepared for life’s eventualities, I did feel  a common bond with those students who were a bit more 'Ron Weasley' in their approach and were a little less thunk through.

But actually the reality is being career-aware at such a young age is probably a necessity now. Latest stats show just under million young people are registered unemployed, that’s around 20% with 56 applicants chasing every graduate job.

In response to these long term depressing stats (at one point it was 89 grads chasing every opportunity) we've invented a whole new layer of employment culture (much like serums have been surreptitiously slipped into my skin care regime) with most young people recognising they needed to serve possibly several (often unpaid) internships now. Recent research from the PRCA showed that 81% of those questions had done one – three internships, before landing a ‘real job’.

One of my ‘real jobs’ is finding such internships, in media, PR and public affairs for The USC Annenberg. I've been doing it for three years now and even with 50+ placements under my belt, it’s extraordinarily difficult. This time round it took six months of talking to more than 100 companies just to secure 15 unpaid summer internships. It's really tough out there for young people, so if you can help them, please do! 

We had the best of it,  no career pressures when we were young and serums now we are old.


Wednesday, 5 June 2013

WE ARE LIVE!

This post is brief as it is in fact just a shameless plug for the latest venture… The Comms Crowd – a recently formed collective of senior comms freelancers, based in London and sharing a passion for B2B technology. Together we provide a complimentary range of skill sets, PR, AR, social, content, design, video etc.

The Comms Crowd  Collective!

It's been nearly two and a half years now since I turned freelance so the collective feels like a natural evolution for me. It’s going to be great for our clients who might be looking for a more robust comms solution than a lone freelancer but who don't have the appetite nor the budget for the full blown agency commitment, and great for us as we get to collaborate, support and inspire each other while delivering to our strengths. We’re going to be sharing the work the responsibility the money and the love!

It’s taken us forever to get the site together least that’s how it feels to a girl who goes long on ‘genius’ ideas and falls short on patience. But we are live now and despite the fact I’ve been immortalized in Ugg boots, I could not be more proud…

Go check us, out all feedback genuinely gratefully received, you know when you stare at something for so long you kind of stop seeing it. But if there is a typo on the home page, please be gentle with me.

Wednesday, 10 April 2013

Top ten tips for writing snappy copy

Hang on lads, I think I've got something...
Marketing copy - when less is always more. Because commercial copy is for public consumption, it's tempting to make it sound grand. This inevitably makes consumption so much more painful. Here's my top tips for edible copy:


  1. Who are you writing for? Write for one person. Assess their motivation for reading your copy. Will it enlighten, inform, entertain, motivate them to act? Think what's in it for them. Assess the time they have to read it, their knowledge level. 
  2. Get the knowledge: Sounds obvious, but you need to know/understand at least as much as your reader. If you don't have the knowledge go and get it. Research it, ask questions, find an expert, get them to draft it if necessary. 
  3. Get it all out: If you find yourself staring at a blank screen then just write anything and everything down to do with what you are trying to say, from this you can create structure, and extract key facts. 
  4. Ask questions which can provide the structure: Ask yourself some basic questions like, Who, Why, When, Where, What and answer them in bullet format. Leave the questions as subheads for now. Arrange the questions into a structure that will form the basis of your logical/persuasive argument. 
  5. Does it serve your purpose as well as theirs? Your copy must add value to the reader but does it also support your company messages, make sure your copy always underlines a key value proposition. If it doesn't why are you writing it? 
  6. So what? Then read it through, anything missing? Ask yourself, ‘Why do I care?’, ‘So what?’ and, ‘What’s so exciting about that?’ If you’re bored by your own copy, imagine how everyone else feels. (At this stage this might be the longest your copy gets, from here on in we are cutting it back). 
  7. Show not tell: De fluff: Use objective observation and facts to show. Not subjective adjectives and opinion to tell. You are not penning a love letter, but presenting the facts in a compelling fashion. Imagine the building is on fire and you cannot leave the office until you have shouted the story from the window. This exercise will ensure you only use the words you need, to say what has to be said and no more. When it comes to strong copy, a couple of carefully crafted sentences are more effective than a whole paragraph of jumbled thoughts. 
  8. Every time you review it, cut it: Aim to reduce word count every time you review the copy (3- 5 times) with decent breaks in between sessions to allow the creative brain to mull over the project, find the right phrase, the most perfect word. 
  9. Don't force it: Could you sneak your copy into conversation, would it sound natural, or would people think you had gone crazy/swallowed a dictionary/been indoctrinated by brand Y. Be kind to your reader, make your copy easy to read! 
  10. Read final draft out loud: Now print off the copy and read it out loud. This really helps spot the ‘silly’ mistakes that your eyes haven’t seen but your tongue will trip over. It will also help you with punctuation. 
You can download these tips in a handy Pdf if you like to keep on your desk and front of mind. Just visit our website http://commscrowd.com/latest-2/

If this was useful you may want to read:
Ten tips for better media interviews - common sense stuff about not being boring
Why the sign off process rarely makes for a better press release - why the sign of cycle is no that helpful
Go on, step on the grass - when it's OK to go off message



Image courtesy of Chris AK http://www.flickr.com/photos/fncll/135465558/

Monday, 18 March 2013

The hidden dangers of PR career talks

In its latest initiative to bridge the diversity gap, the CIPR is to go into secondary schools to explain what a career in PR entails. On the back of my work with The Taylor Bennett Foundation, and USC Annenberg, I'll be looking to lend a hand. Odd how things turn out - given that my first ever careers' talk was possibly a tad off message… 


So children, let me tell you about PR...
Although not entirely sure of my proffesion, my son’s primary school knew I rushed around a lot, shouted into my phone, and muttered darkly about jet lag. And so the headmistress made inquiries as to what it was that was so important, I had yet to attend a single cake sale. On discovering it was comms, she offered me a slot on careers' week, saying it would, ‘make a nice change’. I love public speaking me, so penciled it in without a thought. 

Admittedly the weekend before the gig, it did occur to me that possibly the standard company creds deck, designed to impress your most hard bitten city type, didn't have quite the right content nor tone for a ten year old from an underprivileged, wildly diverse school in Neasden. But either I built a deck from scratch which would take a couple of days and I would never use it again, or I could just make it up as I went along, after all, what would they know? My talk was scheduled for Thursday.
 
On Monday, Elliot was, buzzin'. A midwife had kept them enthralled with heart-warming tales of delivering babies, saving lives and what not. “How super!” I said, though this midwife person sounded like bit of a show off to me. 

On Tuesday, when I picked him up, he was equally full of it. The local policemen had visited with his dog, Blaze, who by all accounts was a magnificent beastie. “Hasn't he got better things to do?” I miffed, as Elliot noted I was doing 35 in a 30 and that technically he should make a citizen’s arrest right there and then.


On Wednesday, a bloody bastard fireman rocked up. 
“Perhaps I should bring in my awards," I wondered out loud. 
“He parked his fire engine in the playground,” said Elli cheerfully, “Let us climb all over it.” 
“That’s cheating!” I howled in dismay. 
My boy looked at me levelly. “Yep. You’re really up against it now Mum.” 

Now, I know at this point, I could have built a deck that talked earnestly about reputation management and CSR. But people, my back was against the wall here and besides my kid was in the audience. That night I dug deep for inspiration and the shiny new deck, was unlike any other deck I have ever built before or after, and ready in the early hours of Thursday morning.



And so it was that I sashayed into that classroom dressed for a full on six-way City pitch. 
I cast a disdainful eye over my charges. “So, I hear you've met a mid-wife, a policemen and a fireman already. Was it just great hearing about how all those clever, kind and brave people have dedicated their lives to helping others?” And they chorused that it was, it really really was. 
“Well I can tell you now,” I said fixing them with a steely gaze. 
“I don’t do anything like that at all.” An attentive hush seeped through the room. 
“What I do, is a very, very TERRIBLE thing.” There was a collective intake of breath. 
“You see,” I said archly as I span neatly on my highest heels and began to pace the room. “I work for the dark side.”
I had them. 
“What I do is make MONEY - by helping other people make MONEY. Lots AND lots of it.” The headmistress actually seemed to be sliding down the wall, but the kids, they were on the edge of their seats… 

An adrenalin-fueled hour later, sharing a celebratory MacDonald’s with the boy, he passed his judgment. 
“I liked the bit when you talked about trainers and celebrity endorsement and brand advocacy. Like, who knew there was no such thing as free will.” And he munched on his onion rings reflectively. 
Looking at me with a sly pride he pronounced, “You did goo
d mum, you did good.” 
Though strangely I was never invited back…

If you enjoyed this you might also like to read:
Searching for your soul role - how the perfect career will find you, even if it's not the one you thought you wanted.
I could a been a contender - the merits of a meandering career path.
The merits of a grounded CV - PRs invented hype, don't you think they might spot it on your CV?

Sunday, 3 February 2013

the second year - we've come a long long way together

Major validations, minor tribulations and lessons learned - two years into my career as an independent PR.


Anybody think I'm great?... Anybody at all?...
Smug moment: Ongoing clients have expanded their remits, project clients return for more projects, growth rates are healthy.
Dark muttering: So how come I haven’t won employee of the month? Been given a round of applause, a certificate, a mug or anything?
Note to self: Stop hankering for external validation. Ain't ever gonna happen.

Smug moment: So stress levels are down, inner contentment levels are up my aura has never been so glowy - everyone says so.

Dark muttering: When you have a bad day they can be astoundingly bad, and the temptation to cry is immense - after all no one is watching. Usually it's just a matter of keeping the faith,but it's easier said than done.
Note to self: Just read the contract you stupid, stupid girl.

Smug moment: I'm getting to do more stuff with more people, getting back to a more integrated approach.
Dark muttering: Peer collaboration is all very well, but where’s a lovely, enthusiastic junior when you need one? Media monitoring - at my age.
Note to self: Get over yourself, it’s the same day rate.

Smug moment: Blog's doing good.
Dark muttering: I'm a bit behind on sorting out my own brand. What brand you say? Quite. I abandon it as soon as client work comes in. Worse still, I keep changing my mind. I have so much more empathy now with past employers that could never ‘get their act together’, turns out neither can I.
Note to self: Use your project management skills, dummy. 

Smug moment: I've enjoyed getting back to my roots, direction, content and outreach. I still get a huge high when I see client content getting picked up.
Dark muttering: Why did I think setting up on my own would get me away from the spreadsheets?
Note to self: There’s software out there to do this stuff, decide where your time is best spent, and spend it there.

Smug moment: So as a reward for going freelance, I got a rescue puppy. He’s a black lab, crossed with something, maybe a kangaroo. But our daily walks give me head space and I've dropped a dress size!
Dark muttering: I somewhat underestimated how wildly distracting would be the dogaroo's ebullient puppy-hood and protracted adolescence - there were days... I'm telling ya...
Note to self: Don't be tempted to spread yourself too thin. Even by a puppy.

Smug moment: I've rejected any pretense at standard working hours, standard dress, standard working practices - and it all works well for me.
Dark muttering: Ask any of my former bosses, I was always borderline employable. Are there rescue shelters for feral freelancers, offering warm and loving forever contracts, doing the filing in the basement for some kindly brand?
Note to self:  Better stick with the programme kid and as Fat Boy Slim might say:

'We've come a long, long way together
Through the hard times and the good
We have to celebrate you, baby
We have to praise you like we should.'

'Cos no one else is gonna do it for you.



This should be the anthem of freelancers everywhere - especially those that don't get out much.

If you enjoyed this you might like to read:
the high and lows of a fledgling freelancer - reporting on the early days
happy freelance birthday to me, I am one - celebrating surviving the first scary year
ten tips for going freelance - learn from my pain





Saturday, 19 January 2013

Made by clever people for clever people

In financial technology can comms people add value or are they the weakest link?

Fintech PR, it ain't rocket science 
but it is quite complicated
I'm a comms person in b2b tech, primarily fintech. Fintech - that’s software geeks creating awesome stuff for banking geeks.

And all fintech comms people have to do is wrap their pretty little heads around how the the global markets work, how a financial institution works and how it makes its money; then evaluate the opportunities and obstacles created by the latest market conditions and regulations that might help or hinder it making that money and just piece together how their client's technology taps into those opportunities/overcomes those obstacles, so that a bank might want to buy it.

You're a fintech PR are you?
 Isn't that an oxymoron?
 
Anyone got a PHD in anything at all they are not using right now?

Dear software geeks, we understand your fear of getting us comms people involved, we share your fear. We have reoccurring nightmares where Anne Robinson is sufficiently underwhelmed by our efforts. But Einstein once said if you can’t explain it to a six year old, you can’t explain it. Let’s assume all the people in the room are clever, it is the common denominator, so there is no need to posture on that. Don’t be tempted to use content as an opportunity to show off how much you know - they know you know.

The key then is to add some value to the debate, to explain the complex lucidly, to ensure that overarching points are not lost in the minutiae of the detail and that those points stack up to a logical argument leading to an insightful conclusion.

It's not as 'easy' as it looks, I can tell ya, getting the people with the PHDs to look up not down, out not in. And if in so doing we tend to simplify things, rather than wonder if we haven't dumbed down your whole reason d'etre, just trust, you know how to build software, we know how to build reputations.

In the kingdom of the big and the clever, it’s the six year old kid you need to impress.

If you found this relevant you may like to read:
Ten tips for writing snappy copy the joys of getting pithy with it
Ten tips for better media interviews how tech companies can give better interviews
Go on,Step on the Grass  when it's OK to go off message