Wednesday, 10 April 2013

Top ten tips for writing snappy copy

Hang on lads, I think I've got something...
Marketing copy - when less is always more. Because commercial copy is for public consumption, it's tempting to make it sound grand. This inevitably makes consumption so much more painful. Here's my top tips for edible copy:


  1. Who are you writing for? Write for one person. Assess their motivation for reading your copy. Will it enlighten, inform, entertain, motivate them to act? Think what's in it for them. Assess the time they have to read it, their knowledge level. 
  2. Get the knowledge: Sounds obvious, but you need to know/understand at least as much as your reader. If you don't have the knowledge go and get it. Research it, ask questions, find an expert, get them to draft it if necessary. 
  3. Get it all out: If you find yourself staring at a blank screen then just write anything and everything down to do with what you are trying to say, from this you can create structure, and extract key facts. 
  4. Ask questions which can provide the structure: Ask yourself some basic questions like, Who, Why, When, Where, What and answer them in bullet format. Leave the questions as subheads for now. Arrange the questions into a structure that will form the basis of your logical/persuasive argument. 
  5. Does it serve your purpose as well as theirs? Your copy must add value to the reader but does it also support your company messages, make sure your copy always underlines a key value proposition. If it doesn't why are you writing it? 
  6. So what? Then read it through, anything missing? Ask yourself, ‘Why do I care?’, ‘So what?’ and, ‘What’s so exciting about that?’ If you’re bored by your own copy, imagine how everyone else feels. (At this stage this might be the longest your copy gets, from here on in we are cutting it back). 
  7. Show not tell: De fluff: Use objective observation and facts to show. Not subjective adjectives and opinion to tell. You are not penning a love letter, but presenting the facts in a compelling fashion. Imagine the building is on fire and you cannot leave the office until you have shouted the story from the window. This exercise will ensure you only use the words you need, to say what has to be said and no more. When it comes to strong copy, a couple of carefully crafted sentences are more effective than a whole paragraph of jumbled thoughts. 
  8. Every time you review it, cut it: Aim to reduce word count every time you review the copy (3- 5 times) with decent breaks in between sessions to allow the creative brain to mull over the project, find the right phrase, the most perfect word. 
  9. Don't force it: Could you sneak your copy into conversation, would it sound natural, or would people think you had gone crazy/swallowed a dictionary/been indoctrinated by brand Y. Be kind to your reader, make your copy easy to read! 
  10. Read final draft out loud: Now print off the copy and read it out loud. This really helps spot the ‘silly’ mistakes that your eyes haven’t seen but your tongue will trip over. It will also help you with punctuation. 
You can download these tips in a handy Pdf if you like to keep on your desk and front of mind. Just visit our website http://commscrowd.com/latest-2/

If this was useful you may want to read:
Ten tips for better media interviews - common sense stuff about not being boring
Why the sign off process rarely makes for a better press release - why the sign of cycle is no that helpful
Go on, step on the grass - when it's OK to go off message



Image courtesy of Chris AK http://www.flickr.com/photos/fncll/135465558/

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